Gold has been considered a solid investment option by many, having lasted several centuries and survived market rise and fall.

But is gold still a solid investment in today’s market? 

In this episode, Brent Mekosh is joined by the President of Miles Franklin Precious Metals Investments, Andy Schectman. Andy explains everything you need to know about precious metals, their role within investment planning, and why they have remained a solid long-term investment. Andy also reveals the current state of gold and silver markets and what that means for the future.

Andy discusses:

  • Why individuals choose alternative investments
  • Where gold and silver fit within investment planning
  • What makes the dollar the world reserve currency
  • How have world events changed the way gold and silver are valued and traded
  • And more!

Resources:

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About Our Guest:

Before starting Miles Franklin, Ltd. in 1989, Andy Schectman became a Licensed Financial Planner specializing in Swiss Franc Investments and alternative investments. At Miles Franklin Ltd., a company that has eclipsed $5 billion in sales, Andy has developed an operation that maintains trust, collaboration, ethical behavior, superior customer service, and satisfaction to better serve its clients. He is responsible for overseeing the firm’s operations and business functions, including strategy and planning, account management, finance, and new business.

Episode 24 - Precious Metals & What Makes the Dollar the World’s Reserve Currency with Andy Schectman

by Brent Mekosh

Investing in commodities is generally considered speculative because of the significant potential for investment loss. Their markets are likely to be volatile and there may be sharp price fluctuations even during periods when prices overall are rising. Gold is subject to the special risks associated with investing in precious metals, including but not limited to: price may be subject to wide fluctuation; the market is relatively limited; the sources are concentrated in countries that have the potential for instability; and the market is unregulated.